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Listening to myself? February 26, 2009

Posted by Levi in Evaluating.
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Weird message from Blip.fm

Weird message from Blip.fm

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Funny ketchup bottle December 8, 2008

Posted by Levi in Evaluating.
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ketchup

Visibility of system status: the system should always keep users informed about what is going on, through appropriate feedback within reasonable time.

Match between system and the real world: the system should speak the users’ language, with words, phrases and concepts familiar to the user, rather than system-oriented terms. Follow real-world conventions, making information appear in a natural and logical order.

(From Nielsen’s usability heuristics).

UX fashion October 8, 2008

Posted by Levi in Evaluating.
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Unique t-shirt made specially for me by the girl I love! Dilbert and Norman do rule. UXrecife logo is on the corner.

Usability problems at work June 19, 2008

Posted by Levi in Evaluating.
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My friend Karine posted on her blog some pics of a soft drink vending machine funnily conformed through usage. She told me that the machine was removed from there (a hospital) only one day after the photos had been taken.

That recalled me some usability problems in my vicinity which I photographed about two years ago. Here they are.

The bathrooms in the company I work for are really nice: pretty clean, cool material, stylish sinks and so on. Maybe the designer thought ‘well, I feel that it is a good idea to keep some space at the left of the sinks so that people can put their stuff there while washing hands, such as cellphones and wallets’.

Trouble sink

The problem is that the sink at the right corner had to be placed too close to the door. The image above tells by itself what often happens!

That’s another officemate getting to work early in the morning. He’s marking the time of his arrival, and the act of passing his identification card through the reader and typing his password makes the door unclose.

Getting to work

By the time of lunch when he’s leaving the office, he has to identify himself again to open the door.

Going to lunch

The question is: what is it for at all? Haven’t the people inside the office already identified themselves earlier? I think that the door should be unlocked to everyone inside there. ‘Why do I have to sign in in order to sign out?’. One should reply that he’s marking his lunch time, but he actually does that once he’s outside the office.

Marking the time

Like what happend to the vending machine Karine told us about, that door was permanently unlocked from the inside right after people became aware of that usability problem.

It’s not my job December 12, 2007

Posted by Levi in Evaluating.
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Instructions hidden under the can puller 

These days I had to open a can of corn and faced this situation: the instructions to do so were printed on the can itlself though the image representing the third step was hidden under the can puller.

Maybe the guy who designed the instructional guide has never talked to the one in the other end who manufacturers the can. It recalls Seth Godin presentation on Gel Conference 2006 when he speaks about the ‘it’s not my job’ design problem.